METODO DI BELLA > NEWS > null > null > Chemoprevention of oral squamous cell carcinomas.

 
Chemoprevention of oral squamous cell carcinomas. di Scheer M, Kuebler AC, Zoller JE.
 
 
Data: 01/09/2004
Tipologia: MDB - Documentazione
Lingua: Italiano
Anno: 2004
 
 
Descrizione:
Among individuals with a history of head and neck cancer and tobacco abuse the risk of second primary cancers in the upper aerodigestive tract is high. Chemoprevention of oral squamous cell carcinomas is based on two conditions: Premalignant mucosa lesions are treated with chemopreventive agents in order to prevent malignant conversion (primary prevention). In secondary prevention of oral cancer, after curative therapy patients are treated by chemoprevention in order to reduce the rate of second primaries. This paper presents a comprehensive clinical review of oral cancer prevention studies, highlighting the agents mostly used, such as beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and retinoids. Although most intervention trials showed good overall response with these substances, high relapse rates and serious side effects, in most cases related to the retinoid compounds were noticed. In addition, in all prospective randomized chemoprevention trials (CARET, ATBC and PHS) no significant evidence of benefit for supplementation with alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene or retinyl palmitate was reported. Copyright 2004 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.
 
 
 
Abstract:
Fonte: Onkologie. 2004 Apr;27(2):187-93.
 
 
 

Among individuals with a history of head and neck cancer and tobacco abuse the risk of second primary cancers in the upper aerodigestive tract is high. Chemoprevention of oral squamous cell carcinomas is based on two conditions: Premalignant mucosa lesions are treated with chemopreventive agents in order to prevent malignant conversion (primary prevention). In secondary prevention of oral cancer, after curative therapy patients are treated by chemoprevention in order to reduce the rate of second primaries. This paper presents a comprehensive clinical review of oral cancer prevention studies, highlighting the agents mostly used, such as beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and retinoids. Although most intervention trials showed good overall response with these substances, high relapse rates and serious side effects, in most cases related to the retinoid compounds were noticed. In addition, in all prospective randomized chemoprevention trials (CARET, ATBC and PHS) no significant evidence of benefit for supplementation with alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene or retinyl palmitate was reported. Copyright 2004 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

 
 
 

 

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